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DCYF director stands by agency as search for girl continues

DCYF director stands by agency as search for girl continues
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with the latest. Ray: Many people wonder how a seven-year-old girl goes unnoticed for two years. But both the DCYF director and the governor stand by the agency’s work. Y: RA remains a mystery between the disappearance of HARMONY MONTGOMERY. A source close to Baby tells News 9 that Harmony has reunited with HERAT FHER ADAM MONTGOMERY after she spent time in Better Care in Massachusetts. In an exclusive interview with WM, UR, the DCYF Director said generally, once reconsolidation occurs, contact with the family is gradually reduced so that case experts can focus on active investigations. >> Difficulty calculating the things that happen when we are not involved with the family. There is a lot that is really important right now that you are trying to figure out what happened with this little girl in the last few years. Ray: The DCYF Director says that since he came on board four years ago, the number of Go CASELOADs has been significantly reduced as a result of family support programs being put in place. He says he stands by the work of social workers in this case and in every case. >> I strongly believe that everyone who does ISTH work does it because they want to help children and families. >> The system is not in a state of instability. We have been on a whole new team just a few years ago, have reformulated our QA process and they are working very hard in all of these cases. Ray: Harmony’s mother said she’s reported her concerns to DCYF since 2019. She’s focused on finding her daughter and infatuating Harmony, ERHO WM hasn’t spoken in two years. The agency asserts that it handles some 12,000 cases annually in the state. IRENE: If you have any information about HARMONY, you can call this line.

The director of DCYF stands by the agency while the search for the missing girl continues

Principal says contact with families usually decreases after family reunification

The director of the New Hampshire Department of Children, Youth and Families stands by his agency’s work as Manchester Police search for a child last seen in 2019, and police say they are trying to find Harmony Montgomery, 7, after notifying them. She disappeared last week. Rewards for information on her whereabouts have grown to $33,000. Anyone with information is asked to call 603-203-6060. The case has drawn attention to DCYF, but Governor Chris Sununu is unwavering in his support for the agency, and its director said the agency is stronger now than it has ever been. In an exclusive interview with News 9 Investigates, Director Joe Ribsam said that when he came on board four years ago, New Hampshire’s child protection system was in crisis. But now, the workload for social workers is dramatically lower, and sophisticated family support programs exist. The governor agreed, and said, “No, the system is not a mess.” “We brought in a whole new team just a few years ago, we’ve revamped our quality assurance and oversight process, and they’re working really hard on all of these cases across the state.” A source close to the baby told News 9 Investigates that Harmony was reunited with her father, Adam Montgomery, after spending time fostering an adoption in Massachusetts. DCYF officials said that in general, once the reunion takes place, contact with the family is gradually reduced. Case workers have to focus on active investigations, which number about 12,000 a year in the state. “It’s hard to calculate what happened when we’re not dealing with family,” Ripsam said. “What is important to know now is what has been going on with this little girl over the past few years.” Thousands of reports of abuse and suspected neglect come to the agency each year, Ripsam said, and the public never sees the action DCYF is taking, which he knows is frustrating. A high-profile case like Harmony’s is sparking an internal review, and “These are really tough issues, for sure,” Ripsam said. “I don’t think they indicate a system failure, per se.” Harmony’s mother said she wanted not only to find her daughter, but also Harmony’s father, whom she said she hasn’t spoken to since 2019. She said she has reported her concerns to DCYF repeatedly since then Previous coverage: Business owners increased the bonus for information about a girl 7-year-old missing, rewards announced for information about 7-year-old missing girl, neighbors react as Manchester Police search for evidence Police are searching for property in Manchester in relation to a missing 7-year-old girl last seen in Manchester in October 2019 ; Police seek advice from the public

The Director of Children, Youth and Families in New Hampshire stands by his agency’s work as Manchester Police search for a child last seen in 2019.

Police say they are trying to find Harmony Montgomery, 7, after she was notified of her disappearance last week. Rewards for information on her whereabouts have grown to $33,000.

Anyone with information is requested to contact 603-203-6060.

The case has drawn attention to DCYF, but Governor Chris Sununu is unwavering in his support for the agency, and its director said the agency is stronger now than it has ever been.

In an exclusive interview with News 9 Investigates, Director Joe Ribsam said that when he came on board four years ago, New Hampshire’s child protection system was in crisis. But now, the workload for social workers is dramatically lower, and sophisticated family support programs exist. The governor agrees.

“No, the system is not in a mess,” Sunono said. “We brought in a whole new team just a few years ago, we’ve revamped our quality assurance and oversight process, and they’re working really hard on all of these cases across the state.”

A source close to the girl told News 9 that Harmony has been reunited with her father, Adam Montgomery, after spending time in foster care in Massachusetts.

DCYF officials said that in general, once the reunion takes place, contact with the family is gradually reduced. Case workers have to focus on active investigations, which number about 12,000 a year in the state.

“It’s hard to calculate what happened when we’re not dealing with family,” Ripsam said. “What is important to know now is what has been going on with this little girl in the past few years.”

Thousands of reports of abuse and suspected neglect come to the agency each year, Ripsam said, and the public never sees the action DCYF is taking, something he knows is frustrating. A high-profile case like that of Harmony leads to an internal review.

“These are really tough issues for sure,” Ripsam said. “I don’t think they indicate a system failure, per se.”

Harmony’s mother said she not only wanted to find her daughter, but also Harmony’s father, who she said she hasn’t spoken to since 2019. She said she has repeatedly reported her concerns to DCYF since then.

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